Trees

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veryone who uses the countryside will sooner or later come across a tree - or around our way they will, anyway. Trees and woods are of particular landscape and conservation importance both in the countryside and in the town, and accordingly they have a number of special laws and regulations. If you intend to fell a tree, or if you want to try to stop someone felling a tree, you need to know the law, as it can be quite complex. As usual, Naturenet will step forward. Read on for our guide.

Tree law and regulations

Trees, boundaries and highwaysPages marked with this symbol are exclusively written for Naturenet.
Tree Preservation Orders (TPOs)Pages marked with this symbol are exclusively written for Naturenet.
Trees in Conservation AreasPages marked with this symbol are exclusively written for Naturenet.
Felling LicensesPages marked with this symbol are exclusively written for Naturenet.
HedgerowsPages marked with this symbol are exclusively written for Naturenet.
Update on new High Hedges lawPages marked with this symbol are exclusively written for Naturenet.

Advice and information about trees and tree surgery

Tree consultants and contractorsPages marked with this symbol are exclusively written for Naturenet: our guide to who to choose, and why.Alder
Trees in gardensPages marked with this symbol are exclusively written for Naturenet.
New treesPages marked with this symbol are exclusively written for Naturenet: the right tree in the right place.
How high are hedges and trees allowed to grow?Pages marked with this symbol are exclusively written for Naturenet
More about treesPages marked with this symbol are exclusively written for Naturenet: books, contact information and organisations to help you find out more about arboriculture and good tree working practice.
Trees and development sitesPages marked with this symbol are exclusively written for Naturenet: a guide to best practice.
Why trees are importantPages marked with this symbol are exclusively written for Naturenet: a personal view by Rowan Adams.
Tree Terms: a website with definitions of a lot of terms you will come across when dealing with trees and arboriculture.

Ask an arborist: post your tree care questions there and a team of UK arborists will try to point you in the right direction... some very good advice available free - you'd normally pay good money for this.
The Native Tree Shop: a service from the Woodland Trust selling native trees online. Tthese are regionally indigenous too, following FC provenance guidelines. Very good.
The-Tree: a huge website with a vast store of well-researched information about British tree lore, species, uses of wood, tree cultivation, stories, mythology and no end of other stuff. Look out for the wonderful guide to the best firewood, and the British trees gallery.
Why Topping Hurts Trees: has some cowboy suggested that your trees should be topped? If so, you need to read this.
Ancient Tree Forum: good place to start for info on UK old trees and veteran trees.
The Woodland Trust Briefings Page: a great resource which gives good background info (although not always up to date) on a whole range of tree and woodland facts as well as stating the Woodland trust viewpoint. Includes pages on Ancient Woodland, seed provenance, translocation, and much more.
British Trees: a major site well worth visiting.
The Wesspur Tree Information and Reference Guide: particularly recommended for US readers, lots of tree-related stuff which would be good for students.
The Forestry Commission.
The Tree Shop: trees for sale online, and some planting and silviculture advice.
Rhododendron: a killer of the countryside.
Coppice Association North West.
National Orchard Forum: umbrella organization for orchard groups throughout the UK, promoting traditional orchards.
The Effect of Trees on Television Reception: BBC information page.
Community Forest Programme: if you want to know about urban forestry and community woodlands in the UK here's a good place to start.
The Arboricultural Information Exchange: more useful and comprehensible than it sounds.
International Tree Foundation: UK based charity to do with planting trees. You can sponsor trees all over the place through them.
Woodlots: putting wood users in touch with producers also worth reading if you want to buy or sell a small woodland, or small or specialist timber or woodland related produce, tools or services. Good coverage across the UK.
UK Tree care mailing list.

Tree Council information on trees including the following recommended guides:

Planting trees.
Threats to trees.
Staking trees.
Management of trees.
Britain's rarest trees.
Ancient trees.

Tree Wardening... something you can do if you love trees.

If you want to do more for trees in your area, contact your local parish council or town council to find out who your local Tree Wardens are, or to volunteer yourself as a Tree Warden. It's a rewarding way to get involved and can make a real difference. (See also VolunteeringPages marked with this symbol are exclusively written for Naturenet).